What's in it for me? Benefits of penicillin allergy testing

February 10, 2016 | Becker's Hospital Review

While penicillin allergy testing is an emerging topic for 2017, healthcare providers are finding that new—and unexpected—patient populations do not understand the importance of penicillin allergy testing. Read the full story

 

Penicillin allergy test determines the safety of useful antibiotic

February 6, 2016 | HealthDay News

Many people who think they're allergic to penicillin don't really have an allergy to this antibiotic, a pediatric expert says.
And anyone who thinks they have had an allergic reaction to penicillin should undergo an allergy test to ensure they really need to avoid these important drugs, Dr. Min Lee advised. Read the full story

 

Penicillin allergy test determines the safety of useful antibiotic

December 13, 2016 | WNDU 16 - NBC South Bend Indiana

About one in ten people report having a penicillin allergy, making it the most common type of medication allergy. But experts are now finding many people think they have it, when they really don’t. Read the full story

 

You're probably not allergic to penicillin, says CDC

October 4, 2016 | NBC Dallas-Fort Worth

The Centers for Disease Control and Prevention says you're probably not allergic to penicillin.
Approximately 10 percent of all U.S. patients report having an allergic reaction to a penicillin-class antibiotic in their past, according to the CDC, however, fewer than 1 percent of the population is truly allergic to penicillin. Read the full story

 

Centers for Disease Control And Prevention urges patients to confirm penicillin allergy

October 4, 2016 | PR Newswire

One question is asked in every U.S. hospital, outpatient clinic, and doctor's office: "Are you allergic to any medication?" If the answer is "penicillin," which is the case for about 30 million, experts now say getting confirmation may be critical to your health.
A growing body of evidence shows the vast majority of people who think they are allergic to penicillin are, in fact, not allergic. Read the full article

 

ID fellow managed clinic helps determine true penicillin allergies

August 23, 2016 | MedicalResearch.com

As many as nine out of ten people who think they are allergic to penicillin are, in fact, not allergic when penicillin allergy skin testing is performed. This mistaken belief, confirmed in multiple other studies and a matter of concern of the U.S. Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC), has widespread implications given that patients who report penicillin allergies tend to get suboptimal antibiotic therapy compared with patients who do not. Read the full interview

 

Penicillin allergy testing aids in antibiotic stewardship

August 22, 2016 | ContagionLive.com

A new study conducted by the University of Maryland has shown that most people who think that they have a penicillin allergy, do not. With more access to testing for penicillin allergy within the hospital setting, and through the use of an infectious disease (ID) fellow-managed penicillin skin testing (PST) program, consisting of physicians, antibiotic use within hospitals can improve, according to the press release. Read the full article

 

Doctors warn of antibiotic allergy misconceptions

July 5, 2016 | ABC3340.com

If you've ever been told you were allergic to penicillin and other antibiotics, doctors are now saying that's probably not the case. Roughly 10 percent of the U.S. population say they're allergic to penicillin. But, the CDC reports only one percent is truly allergic. 99 percent of people who think they are allergic, are actually not. Read the full article

 

10 percent report penicillin allergy, may need re-tested for allergy

June 14, 2016WKBN.com

Ten percent of people say they have a penicillin allergy, and they may be wrong. The American College of Allergy, Asthma and Immunology says you may be avoiding penicillin needlessly. In fact, most people who believe they are allergic are not. Read the full article

 

Think you're allergic to Penicillin? You may be wrong

May 11, 2016 | CBSNews.com

Many people who believe they're allergic to penicillin actually aren't, an allergist says. "Hypersensitivity reactions are the major problem in the use of penicillin," said Dr. Thomas Leath, an allergist with the Texas A&M College of Medicine. "Many people who report a penicillin allergy don't even know why. It could be because they had a reaction when they were very young, or because a family member had an allergic reaction and told their children not to take penicillin," he said in a university news release. Read the full article

 

You could mistakenly believe you're allergic to this common antibiotic

May 4, 2016 | ScienceDaily.com

It's time for your primary care check-up, and the doctor asks you to list any known drug allergies. "Penicillin," you say immediately, although you can't remember actually taking the drug or having a reaction to it -- it was your parents who said so. According to a Texas A&M Health Science Center allergist, many people who believe they're allergic to this antibiotic may not actually be allergic at all. Read the full article

 

Widely used antibiotic allergy skin test often wrong, doctors say

April 19, 2016 | CBC.ca

Most people who believe they're allergic to penicillin truly aren't, say Canadian doctors who stress both children and adults should be diagnosed properly because substitutes for antibiotics like penicillin and amoxicillin are more toxic and expensive. Read the full article

 

Penicillin allergies may be less common than people think

April 14, 2016 | CBS New York

It’s not uncommon to hear of someone who has an allergy to penicillin, but many people who think they’re allergic may not be allergic at all. So what’s the harm if you avoid penicillin even if you’re not allergic? As CBS2’s Dr. Max Gomez explained, using a different antibiotic could cause more side effects, not work as well, and will likely be more expensive. Read the full article

 

 

CDC Wonders "Is it really a penicillin allergy?"

March 21, 2016 | CBS Denver

You probably know someone who thinks he or she is allergic to penicillin. CBS4 Health Specialist Kathy Walsh took an unscientific survey on Denver’s 16th Street Mall.. Read the full article

 

Most patients inaccurately self-report antibiotic allergy

March 21, 2016 | PharmacyTimes.com

Pharmacists should double-check patients self-reporting allergies to ensure that they’re taking accurate and appropriate treatment.   A recent study presented at the American Academy of Allergy, Asthma, & Immunology (AACI) 2016 Annual Meeting investigated the extent to which self-reported allergies were actually true. Read the full article

 

You may not be allergic to penicillin after all

March 16, 2016 | News 4 Jacksonville

Approximately ten percent of the U.S. population has reported to be allergic to penicillin, one of the most vital antibiotics prescribed by doctors for a variety of conditions like skin, sinus, throat and ear infections. Penicillin is part of a family of antibiotics known as beta lactams, and are very commonly used because it is often the best drug to treat infections, safe to use during pregnancy and breastfeeding, safe for children, and less expensive than similar drugs. Read the full article

 

Patients often overstate penicillin allergy

March 6, 2016 | MedPageToday.com

Among a group of inpatients who had a penicillin allergy listed in their electronic health records (EHR), 97.6% did not actually have an allergic reaction to a penicillin antibiotic, researchers reported here. Read the full article

 

You may not be allergic to penicillin after all

March 16, 2016 | News 4 Jacksonville

Approximately ten percent of the U.S. population has reported to be allergic to penicillin, one of the most vital antibiotics prescribed by doctors for a variety of conditions like skin, sinus, throat and ear infections. Penicillin is part of a family of antibiotics known as beta lactams, and are very commonly used because it is often the best drug to treat infections, safe to use during pregnancy and breastfeeding, safe for children, and less expensive than similar drugs. Read the full article

 

Millions who think they are allergic to penicillin may not be

February 16, 2016 | CBS Local Pittsburgh

For years, millions of Americans have been told they have an allergy to penicillin. As it turns out, many of them actually do not. So, why were they told that and how can you get to the bottom of whether you’re allergic to it? One in ten people carry this label, based on some distant, childhood event. But, was it a true penicillin allergy with hives or anaphylaxis? Read the full article

 

Chronic hives and self-reported penicillin allergy often co-exist

February 8, 2016 | MedicalResearch.com

Approximately 10% of the general population has self-reported penicillin allergy.  Because hives and rash are often attributed to drug allergy, we began to think about certain conditions that may be confused with penicillin allergy.  Chronic urticaria, which is defined as the presence of hives for six weeks or longer, is one such condition.  We were interested in looking at the prevalence of self-reported penicillin allergy in patients with chronic urticaria, and the prevalence of chronic urticaria in patients with self-reported penicillin allergy. Read the full article

 

Are you really allergic to penicillin?

February 2, 2016 | FOX 61 CT

Approximately 10% of people in the US report having a penicillin allergy to their doctor. Avoiding all penicillin type antibiotics can drastically reduce the drugs that your doctor can select and put you more at risk of running out of options if your infection is due to a resistant strain. People tie up all types of adverse events as allergies but this is a mistake that can have important consequences. With dozens of drugs built off of the basic penicillin core called the beta-lactam ring, you don’t want to exclude their use if you don’t have to. Read the full article

 

Penicillin allergy: a common problem

February 1, 2016 | VeryWell.com

Penicillin and related antibiotics are some of the oldest and most commonly used antibiotics available. They are active against a wide variety of infections, are inexpensive, and are generally well tolerated. Unfortunately, penicillin allergy is very common, with 10% of the population reporting an allergy to this medication. Studies show, however, that when people who report being allergic to penicillin are tested for the allergy, nearly 90% are not allergic, and are able to take the medicine just fine. That's often because this allergy is often temporary. Testing for penicillin allergy is available, is a relatively simple procedure, and most often leads to a person who thought they were allergic to penicillin to find out that they are not actually allergic to the antibiotic, or are no longer allergic. Read the full article